Friday, June 9, 2017

Lessons Learned from Preemergence Corn Herbicide Research this Spring

Note: The following two videos have been produced by UMN Extension Educators for Crops who are based in Rochester, MN. The message regarding preemerge herbicides is valuable. The two videos presented here provide a review of herbicide performance in corn, the first from May 27, 2017; the second is a follow-up posted June 8, 2017. I hope you find them informative when considering your own preemerge and post emerge herbicide program planning.
Phillip Glogoza, UMN Extension Educator for Crops
Extension Regional Office - Moorhead


by Ryan Miller and Lisa Behnken

Last week, we shared a video on Spring herbicide activity concerns due to cool and wet conditions following preemergent corn herbicide applications (Spring herbicide activity concerns -- May 27, 2017). In the video, we noted that weeds were coming through and wondered if the preemergent herbicides that had been applied would do their job. 

We are back in the research plots in Rochester and checking-in to see how things have been progressing over the past week. In this week's video, we're sharing some interesting observations. 

We have seen differences in the time it takes for different preemergent herbicides to activate, and differences in "reach-back" with different herbicide products. We have also seen the benefit of preemergent herbicides in taking some of the pressure off of postemergence applications by providing at least some of our weed control, and by extending the window to accomplish postemergence applications. 

To view this week's video, Spring herbicide activity progress, visit https://youtu.be/MBdMDr7LIEc. We will be following this trial during the 2017 growing season and providing periodic video updates.


Spring herbicide activity concerns, May 27, 2017

Spring herbicide activity progress, June 8, 2017


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For other information from University of Minnesota Extension crops, visit z.umn.edu/crops.



Thursday, June 8, 2017

Video: Protecting sugar beets

A Brief Review of Key Soybean Seedling Diseases

by Dean Malvick

Conditions are favorable for soybean seedling disease in many areas. Wet soil, slow emergence, and delayed planting have been favorable for seedling diseases in many areas of southern and central Minnesota. Now as the soil dries and warms up, infected plants may wilt and collapse rapidly due to damaged root systems. 


Problems with seedling disease have been reported from several areas, and more will likely be noted as plants continue to emerge. Given that seedling diseases have developed in some of the well-drained soil at Rosemount, MN, these problems are not restricted to poorly-drained fields this year. This is a good time to scout fields for seedling disease problems.

Wednesday, June 7, 2017

Wheat Crop and Pest Survey Maps


The first maps summarizing current small grain crop stages, disease and insect incidence have been posted. The southern areas of Minnesota represent winter wheat, which is much further developed than the NW HRSW, oats, and the occasional rye. West central and northwest will consist mainly of HRSW and Barley (similar for North Dakota).

IPM CROP SURVEY STARTS for Wheat, Barley and other crops

We have a group of field scouts for the Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Crop Survey for 2017. Field scouts will survey wheat, barley (other small grains, too) and soybean for major disease and insect pests. The purpose of the survey program is to monitor for these economic pests and to provide pest alerts and related IPM strategies for producers and crop consultants. Field pest data that has been geo-referenced with GPS coordinates is compiled weekly and regional maps are created to show incidence and severity of pests in areas of Minnesota and North Dakota.

Maps are now being posted weekly at:


University of Minnesota Extension participates in the IPM Crop Survey in coordination with North Dakota State University Extension Service. In Minnesota, scouts are located in Crookston, Morris and Blue Earth, MN. Phillip Glogoza, Madeleine Smith and Jared Goplen coordinate the MN survey. 

Funding to support these efforts in Minnesota have been awarded by the Minnesota Soybean Research and Promotion Council and the Minnesota Wheat Research and Promotion Council.