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Showing posts from August, 2017

Stressed out corn?: Crop might be at risk for stalk rots and lodging

While corn maturity and harvest are still some time away, it is never too early to be aware of potential challenges to crop growth and development and harvest.

Are you at risk of leaving some ears behind? As ears fill out and eventually begin to mature and dry down, corn plants become very top-heavy. Stalk rots increase the chance that plants will fall over (lodge) due to a combination of gravity and weather. In addition to being not-so-fun to harvest, lodged plants can significantly decrease harvestable yield by literally leaving some ears on the ground.

Stress conditions favor stalk rots. The combination of mid-season environmental conditions that favor kernel-set followed by conditions that stress plants increases the risk of stalk rot. This year, weather conditions in much of Northwestern Minnesota were relatively mild during silking and pollen shed, favoring good kernel set. However, since then much of the crop has experienced abnormally dry or even moderate drought conditions duri…

Soybean Plot Tours in NW Minnesota | August 29 - 31, 2017

Soybean Plot ToursNW MinnesotaAugust 29 - 31, 2017


Plan to attend the Strip-till Expo on September 6, 2017

Jodi DeJong-Hughes, Extension educator

Plan to attend this year’s

Strip-Till Expo Wednesday, September 6th
Location:  west ofFergus Falls, MN at the University of Minnesota - North Dakota State University Tillage Research Trials  (see directions below)



Registration begins at 8:30 a.m. and the program will run from 9:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.





Update: Wheat Stem Sawfly infestation levels found in Polk County

Wheat stem sawfly (WSS) are being found at significant levels in Polk County. Field surveys were conducted from August 14 to 18, 2017 to learn more about the levels of infestation and the possible size of the area impacted. 

The inspected fields had infestations on the field margins ranging from a low of 0 to a high of 15 WSS/row foot. Every field inspected had fewer infested stems as sampling moved further into the field. Edge effects are pretty strong with this insect as they overwinter in stubble and migrate to nearby wheat the next year.

Target weeds after small grain harvest

By Jared Goplen, Tom Peters, and Dave Nicolai
One of the many benefits of including small grains in crop rotations is improved broadleaf weed control and breaking up weed lifecycles. Although freshly harvested small grain fields have a clean look, they often have weeds hiding in the stubble. The most prominent weeds in stubble fields are often late-emerging weeds like waterhemp and other pigweed species that emerged after early season herbicide applications were made. Control escaped weeds now to prevent seed production and weed seed bank replenishment.

Wheat Stem Sawfly Causing Problems in Polk County Wheat Fields

Prepared by Phillip Glogoza, Jochum Wiersma and Ian McRae
As wheat harvest moves northward, we are detecting infestations of Wheat Stem Sawfly in fields in Polk County. Recent storms and strong winds have helped bring these problems to front and center.

UPDATE: NW MN Soybean Aphid Scouting Summary for July 31 to August 8, 2017

Soybean aphid populations continue to increase in west and south central Minnesota, though we are approaching a time when growth stage, day length and natural controls in those fields are likely to lead to declining populations soon. More fields have been treated, BUT not every field is at threshold and scouting to determine treatment needs is highly recommended. 

Also, be sure to follow up treatment by scouting to determine control success. Some of the fields we have scouted in NW MN show lots of dead aphids. HOWEVER, it is not uncommon to see plants where aphids survived, numbering into the 100's on some of those plants. These are fields most likely treated with a Pyrethroid - Organophosphate premix.

Where we have treated research plots with chlorpyrifos, kill has been very good. The only aphids in those sites have been winged, migrating aphids in the tops of plants. Their numbers and their babies have remained low in number and time should be on our side in those locations.

Report…
Here are three recent updates, all relating to weed management issues:

Assessing and documenting yield loss due to dicamba injury in soybean
by Jeff Gunsolus, Extension weed scientist

Photo 1. Leaf cupping symptoms of dicamba injury in soybean. Photo: Bruce Potter As we enter August, the big unknown in fields presenting dicamba injury symptoms will be dicamba’s impact on soybean yield. Unfortunately, due to the sensitivity of non-Xtend soybeans to dicamba, injury symptoms are not reliable indicators of yield loss. The level of yield loss depends on exposure at vegetative or reproductive stage of growth, persistence of injury symptoms, and growing conditions post-exposure.
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Response of soybean yield to dicamba exposure: A Research-based report by Jeff Gunsolus, Extension weed scientist

Xtendimax drift onto non dicamba-tolerant soybean. Photo: Liz Stahl As you continue to assess and document the impact of dicamba injury on soybean yield, I thought it would be timely to make you aw…